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Shakur Stevenson Americas Next Boxing Superstar Plus Nico Hernandez And Charles Conwell SIGNED Pre Tournament Sponsored Team USA Olympic Postcard

Shakur Stevenson Americas Next Boxing Superstar Plus Nico Hernandez And Charles Conwell SIGNED Pre Tournament Sponsored Team USA Olympic Postcard

Shakur Stevenson America's next boxing superstar plus Nico Hernandez and Charles Conwell MULTI SIGNED pre 2016 Rio Olympics sponsored (Liberty Mutual Insurance) USA Boxing Team 5 1/2" x 8 1/2" postcard.



Shakur Stevenson - 56kg Silver Medallist
Shakur Stevenson's quest to become the first men's boxing gold medallist for the United States since 2004 fell short in Rio, when dropping a split decision to Cuba's Robeisy Ramírez, who is now a two-time gold medallist.

Stevenson, 19, had previously been unbeaten in international competition, including wins in Rio over Brazil’s Robenílson de Jesus and Mongolia’s Tsendbaatar Erdenebat, plus a walkover victory against Vladimir Nikitin of Russia in the semi final.

But Ramírez, 22, was a new level of opponent for him. The Cuban was sensational four years ago in London, when at 18 he won the flyweight gold medal. Moving up to bantamweight in Rio, he was just as good, dominating fights with Shiva Thapa of India, Mohamed Hamout of Morocco, and Jiawei Zhang of China. In the semi final, he defeated Murodjon Akhmadaliev of Uzbekistan in one of the best displays of boxing seen in Rio.

There was some ugliness to this fight, as both Stevenson and Ramírez are slick southpaws, crafty and hard to hit, with quick hands. It was Ramírez who let his hands go more, which won him the first round unanimously, and the third round on two of three cards. Stevenson took all three cards in the second round.

Stevenson is going to turn pro next, as he’s ready to sign a deal with Mayweather Promotions. He’s cited Floyd Mayweather and Andre Ward — the last American male to win a gold medal -- as his inspirations in the ring, and really, the sky is the limit for Shakur Stevenson. At 19, he gave a tough fight to one of the best amateur boxers in the World.

The medal is the first for the United States at this weight since Clarence Vinson won bronze in 2000. The last time an American won gold at the weight was Kennedy McKinney in 1988.






Nico Hernandez - 49kg Bronze Medallist
Entering boxing at the 2016 summer Olympics, 20-year-old Hernandez—a virtual unknown in boxing—weighed in at 108 pounds, entering the men's light flyweight division. Not expected to win, his unexpected Olympic victories created a stir in the boxing community. His USA Olympic boxing coach was Billy Walsh (though his life-long boxing coach had been his own father, Lewis Hernandez).

For the first time since 1980, protective headgear would not be worn by Olympic boxers during their matches. This would become a problem for Hernandez in his final fight.

First Fight
Though not expected to beat Manuel Cappai of Italy, and starting off slowly in the first round, Hernandez found his strength in the second and third round, overwhelming Cappai, and winning.

Second Fight
In his second fight, Hernandez faced Russia's Vasili Egorov, silver medallist of the last World championship, and the defending European champion. Though again starting off slowly, Hernandez surprised his opponent, in the second and third rounds, with fast aggression, moving in close and overpowering Egorov—winning by unanimous decision of the judges.

Third Fight
In his third fight, this one for the Olympic bronze medal, he faced Carlos Quipo Pilataxi of Ecuador. Again starting slowly, he came from behind to win, again—ensuring himself an Olympic medal, and startling the boxing World.

Fourth & Final Fight
In his fourth fight—the semi finals, for the Olympic silver medal—he fought the Asian champion, Hasanboy Dusmatov of Uzbekistan, Hernandez again started slowly, but this time could not make the come-from-behind win. One reporter suggested he had trouble figuring out Dusmatov's awkward, left-handed style. The smaller and quicker Dusmatov was the aggressor in the first round. An accidental head-butt gashed Hernadez, leading to a bloody face and briefly blurred vision; a doctor cleaned him up between rounds 2 and 3, but Hernandez did not rebound fully. And, in the third and final round, the referee interrupted the fight to have a doctor attend the cut. For the rest of the fight, Dusmatov mostly avoided Hernandez, backing away and keeping out of Hernandez's way. Hernández, by his own admission, "waited too long" for things to change.

After applauding his opponent's victory, Hernandez admitted fighting "his fight instead of my own," adding, "I let him come in and make the fight too wild and that’s how I lost." the judges unanimously credited the win to Dusmatov with scores of 30-27, 30-27 and 29-28.

Despite defeating Hernández for the Olympic Silver Medal, rival Dusmatov described the match as his own most difficult fight of the Olympics, up to that point—describing Hernández as a "champion," who is "really, really strong."






Charles Conwell (Cleveland, Ohio), the youngest member of the U.S. Olympic Boxing Team, fell in his Olympic debut in Rio de Janeiro. Conwell faced off with returning Olympian Krishan Vikas of India in middleweight preliminary competition.

The two boxers opened slowly as they each looked to find openings and pick their shots over the first three minutes. The pair started mixing it up more in the final 60 seconds of the round and Conwell landed a strong combination in the final 30 seconds of the bout. Conwell came out quicker in the second round of action, landing strong straight shots and connecting with an eye catching combination midway through the round. He entered the third round down two rounds of two of the judges’ scorecards and came out firing away as the final stanza opened. Vikas moved early and often in the last round and despite Conwell’s aggression in the third, the Indian boxer took a 3-0 decision in the bout.

“I thought I pulled out the victory. He’s a good competitor, a good tough guy but I thought I did enough to pull it out. I can always do better. I’m a fighter so I’m used to going out there and trying to get the feel and go off the momentum of the fight,” Conwell said. “I wish nothing but the best to my opponent and I hope he keeps pulling out victories.”

Conwell graduated from Cleveland Heights High School and spent much of his senior year away from home for competitions and training camps. Although his Olympic run ended sooner than he hoped, Conwell looks forward to returning home to Cleveland and awaiting what’s next. “I’m going to go back and enjoy time with family and friends. I’ve been gone for so long so I want to back and enjoy time with them,” he said. “Whatever happens, happens. I’m still going to be training and still working hard, grinding to come back and come harder.”

Conwell earned his berth on the U.S. Olympic Team with gold medals at the U.S. Olympic Trials in December and Americas Qualifier in March. Despite his intense travel and training schedule, Conwell managed to graduate on time in June.

Conwell is the second American boxer Vikas has faced in the last two Olympic Games. Vikas initially won his bout over 2012 Olympian and current professional contender Errol Spence Jr. before the bout was overturned in London and Spence was reinstated.



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Shakur Stevenson (born June 28, 1997) is an American amateur who competes in the bantamweight division.

Personal Life
A native of Newark, New Jersey, Stevenson is the oldest of nine siblings. He took up boxing age five under his grandfather Wali Moses and cites Andre Ward as his influence.

Amateur Career
Stevenson had a very successful career at Junior and Youth Level, winning the 2014 AIBA Youth World Championships and 2014 Youth Olympic Games. In 2015 he won the Senior US Olympic Trials thus qualifying for the US boxing team at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. In 2016, he won the Olympic silver medal for the USA, losing to Robeisy Ramirez of Cuba in the gold medal match. He was the highest-medalling male for the USA (Claressa Shields won gold). He so was impressive that Floyd Mayweather called him "the next..Mayweather"












Nico Hernández (born 4 January 1996)[1] is an American, from Wichita, Kansas. He competed at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where won an Olympic Bronze Medal for the United States, in the Men's light flyweight division—the United States' first Olympic men's boxing medal since the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

Early Athletic Experiences
Hernandez's career was chiefly built on the relationship with two colleagues: his father, and his best friend. Hernandez was first introduced to boxing at the age of 9, by his father, Lewis, a truck driver in Wichita, Kansas, who later became his coach. The boy took a liking to boxing with his first encounter—then became an energetic young fighter, winning his first 25 fights, aggressively reaching for tougher, even older and bigger, opponents. Along with best friend Tony Losey—a troubled teen also coached (and rehabilitated) by Lewis—the two boys developed into competitive boxers, with aspirations of winning 2016 Olympic gold medals together (Losey rising to USA Boxing’s 3rd-place ranking among welterweights, and younger Hernandez winning gold at the National Junior Olympics in 2011 and 2012.). They remained intensely involved with boxing, together—supporting each others' careers—until 2014, when Losey died in an industrial accident.

At Wichita North High School, Hernandez also excelled in wrestling, eagerly taking on better and bigger opponents with a ferocity and endurance that shocked them, and his coach.

2016 Olympic Qualifications
Hernandez entered Boxing Qualification for the 2016 Summer Olympics. At the 2016 American Boxing Olympic Qualification Tournament held in Buenos Aires, Argentina, he won the silver medal in the men's flyweight. He defeated Argentina’s Leandro Blanc in the semifinals to secure his place in the Olympic competition and advanced to the final to face Yuberjen Martinez of Colombia.

2016 Rio Olympics
Entering boxing at the 2016 summer Olympics, 20-year-old Hernandez—a virtual unknown in boxing—weighed in at 108 pounds, entering the men's light flyweight division. Not expected to win, his unexpected Olympic victories created a stir in the boxing community. His USA Olympic boxing coach was Billy Walsh (though his life-long boxing coach had been his own father, Lewis Hernandez).

For the first time since 1980, protective headgear would not be worn by Olympic boxers during their matches. This would become a problem for Hernandez in his final fight.

First Fight
Though not expected to beat Manuel Cappai of Italy, and starting off slowly in the first round, Hernandez found his strength in the second and third round, overwhelming Cappai, and winning.

Second Fight
In his second fight, Hernandez faced Russia's Vasili Egorov, silver medallist of the last World championship, and the defending European champion. Though again starting off slowly, Hernandez surprised his opponent, in the second and third rounds, with fast aggression, moving in close and overpowering Egorov—winning by unanimous decision of the judges.

Third Fight
In his third fight, this one for the Olympic bronze medal, he faced Carlos Quipo Pilataxi of Ecuador. Again starting slowly, he came from behind to win, again—ensuring himself an Olympic medal, and startling the boxing World.

Fourth & Final Fight
In his fourth fight—the semi finals, for the Olympic silver medal—he fought the Asian champion, Hasanboy Dusmatov of Uzbekistan, Hernandez again started slowly, but this time could not make the come-from-behind win. One reporter suggested he had trouble figuring out Dusmatov's awkward, left-handed style. The smaller and quicker Dusmatov was the aggressor in the first round. An accidental head-butt gashed Hernadez, leading to a bloody face and briefly blurred vision; a doctor cleaned him up between rounds 2 and 3, but Hernandez did not rebound fully. And, in the third and final round, the referee interrupted the fight to have a doctor attend the cut. For the rest of the fight, Dusmatov mostly avoided Hernandez, backing away and keeping out of Hernandez's way. Hernández, by his own admission, "waited too long" for things to change.

After applauding his opponent's victory, Hernandez admitted fighting "his fight instead of my own," adding, "I let him come in and make the fight too wild and that’s how I lost." the judges unanimously credited the win to Dusmatov with scores of 30-27, 30-27 and 29-28.

Despite defeating Hernández for the Olympic Silver Medal, rival Dusmatov described the match as his own most difficult fight of the Olympics, up to that point—describing Hernández as a "champion," who is "really, really strong."

Hometown Impact
Hernandez was Wichita's first Olympic medallist since the 1984 team gold-medal wins of women's basketball star Lynette Woodard and men's volleyball athlete Marc Waldie—and the first Wichitan to win an individual Olympic medal since runner Jim Ryun won silver in the 1968 Mexico City Olympics.

Future Plans
USA Today reported that Hernandez plans to turn to professional boxing after the 2016 Olympics.











Charles Albert Shone Conwell (born November 2, 1997) is an American. He competed in the men's middleweight event at the 2016 Summer Olympics. He faced Vikas Krishan Yadav of India in the first round of the tournament, in a loss by unanimous decision.

Name: Charles Conwell
Weight Class: Middleweight
Height: 5-9
Weight: 165 lbs
DOB: 11/2/1997
Hometown: Cleveland , Ohio
High School: Cleveland Heights High School
Team/Club: http://www.teamusa.org/usa-boxing/athletes/Carlos-Balderas
Coach(es): Charles Conwell Sr., Otha Jones and Roshawn Jones

Olympic Experience
*2016 U.S. OLYMPIAN

World Championship Experience
*2014 YOUTH WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS PARTCIPANT

Other Career Highlights
*AMERICAS OLYMPIC QUALIFIER CHAMPION
*2015 USA BOXING YOUTH MALE ATHLETE OF THE YEAR
*2016 U.S. OLYMPIC TRIALS CHAMPION
*TWO-TIME USA BOXING YOUTH NATIONAL CHAMPION
*2015 NATIONAL GOLDEN GLOVES CHAMPION

Personal: Charles is one of nine siblings (he is the second youngest)...He graduated from Cleveland Heights High School three months after making the 2016 U.S. Olympic Team...He is the youngest member of the U.S. Olympic Boxing Team.