"THE GREATEST"
MUHAMMAD ALI

MANCHESTER Trio Of Champions 1932 to 1933 King And Brown Plus McAvoy And Manager Fleming Vintage Original Photo

MANCHESTER Trio Of Champions 1932 to 1933 King And Brown Plus McAvoy And Manager Fleming Vintage Original Photo

MANCHESTER trio of boxing champions 1932 to 1933 Johnny King (British bantamweight), Jackie Brown (flyweight World champion), Jock McAvoy (British middleweight) & manager Harry Fleming vintage original black & white 4 1/2" x 3 1/4" photo.

Condition very good

Price: £55

Johnny King, a native of Manchester, won the Northern area bantamweight championship in 1931, and on 10th October 1932, he beat Dick Corbett over 15 rounds on points at Manchester for the British title and Lonsdale belt. Corbett turned the tables on points in a 15 round championship contest on 12th February 1934 at Manchester, and it was not until 27th May 1935 that King regained the title by beating Len Hampston on points over 15 rounds again in Manchester.

King had won the British Empire title at Olympia on 12th June 1933, but on 3rd July of the same year he was beaten by Al Brown over 15 rounds at Manchester in a World title match.











Jackie Brown (November 29, 1909, in Collyhurst, Manchester, England – March 15, 1971) was British and European flyweight champion, and was also recognised by the National Boxing Association as the World flyweight champion.

Professional Career
He had his first professional fight on 18 May 1925, at the age of sixteen, defeating Harry Gainey on points over six rounds.

In October 1929, he won the vacant British flyweight title, knocking out Bert Kirby in three rounds. In March 1930, he defended the title against Kirby, and was knocked out in the third round. In February 1931, he met Kirby for the third time, winning back the title with fifteen-round points decision.

In May 1931, he won the European flyweight title, beating Lucien Popescu, of Romania on points. In the next two months he defended this title twice, winning on points against Emile Degand, of Belgium and Vincenzo Savo, of Italy.

In September 1932, he defended both his titles against Jim Maharg, winning on a disqualification in the eighth, for a low blow.

World Title
In October 1932, he fought Victor 'Young' Perez, of Tunisia for the World flyweight champion, beating him in thirteen rounds when Perez’ corner threw in the towel. Brown was recognized as World flyweight champion by the National Boxing Association of America.

In June and September 1933, he defended his World and European titles against Valentin Angelmann, of France, winning both defences on points.

In December 1933, he defended his British, European and World titles against Chris ‘Ginger’ Foran of Liverpool, winning on points.

In June 1934, he defended his World and European titles against Valentin Angelmann, for the third time, this time, after his previous two wins drawing on points. A year later Brown was stripped of his European title for not giving Angelmann a return bout.

Loss Of World Title
In September 1935, he defended his British and World flyweight titles against the talented Scottish fighter, Benny Lynch. He lost his titles when the referee stopped the contest in the second round.

Career As A Bantamweight
Following the loss of his titles, Brown continued fighting as a bantamweight. In May 1937 he fought holder Johnny King for the British bantamweight title, losing by a knockout in the thirteenth round.

This was his last challenge for a national or international title, but he continued fighting until July 1939. He then retired, but made a one-fight comeback in February 1948, when he scored a points victory over Billy Stevens over eight rounds.











Jock McAvoy (November 20, 1908 – November 20, 1971) who fought from 1927 to 1945. He was born Joseph Patrick Bamford in Rochdale, Lancashire. Jo Bamford adopted the name Jock McAvoy so that his mother did not relaise he was boxing. Initially discovered trained and managed by Joseph Tolley at Tolley's famous Rochdale Boxing Club, reference the Rochdale thunder bolt. During his career he held the British and commonwealth middleweight titles. McAvoy's bid to capture the European middleweight crown was derailed when he lost a unanimous decision to future World middleweight champion Marcel Thil of France in Paris on January 15, 1935.

He was unlucky never to have been World Middleweight Champion, considering his performance against Ed 'Babe' Risko. The American was champion when they fought, but as McAvoy was considered such a dangerous opponent, Risko's handlers would only allow the two to meet in a non-title affair. Their apprehension was fully justified when McAvoy utterly destroyed the champion, sending him to the canvas 6 times for a first round knockout. However, McAvoy had performed too well for his own good, and boxing politics being what they were, he was never allowed a rematch with the title at stake.

McAvoy then decided to campaign as a light heavyweight in the United States. In November 1935 he made his debut in America, and put together a win streak that culminated in his obtaining a title shot in famed Madison Square Garden in New York. On March 13, 1936 he was outpointed over 15 rounds by World champion John Henry Lewis.

After his unsuccessful bid to capture the light heavyweight crown, McAvoy returned to England, and his next fight was for the British and British Empire heavyweight titles held by Welshman, Jack Petersen. Petersen won the fifteen round fight on points. His most important bouts thereafter were against Len Harvey, who outpointed him twice over 15 rounds at Harringay Arena, and future light heavyweight World champion Freddie Mills, who beat him on points and forced him to retire in the re-match with an injured back.

McAvoy was a hard puncher who scored 89 KOs in his 132 wins. He lost 14 times and was held to a draw once. McAvoy was named to the Ring Magazine's list of 100 greatest punchers of all time.

In 1951 he was stricken with polio and was wheelchair bound the rest of his life.