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Roberto Duran vs Sugar Ray Leonard II PPV Fight Poster

Roberto Duran vs Sugar Ray Leonard II PPV Fight Poster

Roberto Duran vs Sugar Ray Leonard II PPV fight poster, billed "STONE vs SUGAR" ONCE AGAIN!!! for the welterweight championship of the World, 25th November 1980, Louisiana Superdome, New Orleans. Measuring 24" x 19". Beautifully presented in removable frame.

Roberto Duran fought for the welterweight title in June 1980 and beat Sugar Ray Leonard via a 15-round unanimous decision. In the November re-match, however, Durán shockingly quit. In round 8, Durán turned around, walked to his corner and gave up, supposedly saying the now famous words, "no más" (no more). However he claims to have actually said, "No quiero pelear con el payaso." (Meaning "I do not want to fight with this clown.") Referee Octavio Meyran, perhaps as incredulous as was the rest of the world at what he was seeing, asked Durán if he was sure, and Durán then said, "No más, no más" (no more, no more). In violation of what any professional fighter does on the day of a fight, Durán gorged himself after the weigh-in, claimed he quit because he was having stomach cramps. The controversy regarding this bout continues to this day.

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Duran vs Leonard II "No Mas"

Equipped with speed, ability and charisma, Sugar Ray Leonard, filled the boxing void left when Muhammad Ali retired in 1981. With the American public in search of a new boxing superstar, Leonard came along at precisely the right time.
Leonard was named Fighter of the Decade for the 1980s. And why not. He entered the decade a champion and left a champion. In between, he won an unprecedented five world titles in five weight classes and competed in some of the era's most memorable contests.

There were few things Leonard could not do once the bell rang. But what he did best was analyze his opponents and devise a strategy to overcome them. He found a way to beat stylists, sluggers and brawlers. And beneath that flashy surface was a competitor with the remorseless ability to put an opponent away when they were hurt. There were few better finishers in boxing.

Leonard surfaced in the public's imagination after winning a gold medal at the 1976 Olympics. He won the WBC welterweight title in 1979 after stopping fellow Hall-of-Famer Wilfred Benitez in a violent chess match that pitted two of the game's master technicians.

After one successful defense, Leonard faced legendary lightweight champion Roberto Duran in what may be the most anticipated non-heavyweight fight in history. In a fast-paced battle, Duran dethroned Leonard with a unanimous 15-round decision. Leonard regained the title when Duran quit in the eighth-round of their rematch.

In 1981, Leonard climbed the scale and knocked out junior middleweight champion Ayube Kalule. He then returned to the welterweight division for a unification showdown with WBA champ Thomas Hearns. Leonard and Hearns waged a memorable war but Leonard, behind on all three scorecards, managed to knock Hearns out in the 14th round.

After one more fight, Leonard, suffering from a detatched retina in his left eye, retired. He returned to the ring in 1984 and knocked out Kevin Howard only to retire again.

After nearly three years of inactivity, Leonard returned again and pulled off the Upset of the Decade when he outpointed Marvin Hagler to win the middleweight title in 1987. Leonard added titles four and five in November 1988 when he recovered from an early knockdown to stop power-punching Canadian Donny Lalonde. At stake that night was Lalonde's WBC light heavyweight title and the vacant WBC super middleweight title.

Leonard made two successful title defenses of the super middleweight title, fighting to a controversial draw with Hearns and decisioning Duran in their third and final encounter.

Leonard retired again, but could not stay away. At age 34, he challenged WBC super welterweight champion Terry Norris in 1991. He was dropped twice and lost by unanimous decision at Madison Square Garden.

The former five-division champion announced his retirment in the ring immediately after the Norris fight. But in March 1997, he launched another unsuccessful comeback, which ended via a fifth-round TKO to Hector Camacho. It was the first time Leonard had ever been stopped.






Roberto Duran was born in El Chorrillo, Panama. June 16, 1951 Duran turned professional on February 23, 1968 and would win world titles in four weight divisions and compete in five decades. He was undefeated when he TKO'd Ken Buchanan in 13 rounds for the WBA lightweight championship on June 26, 1972 at Madison Square Garden. Twelve successful defenses followed, including wins over Jimmy Robertson, Guts Ishimatsu, Esteban De Jesus, Ray Lampkin, Lou Bizzarro, and Edwin Viruet. Duran next moved up in weight to battle for the welterweight title and captured the WBC belt with a 15 round unanimous decision over Sugar Ray Leonard in Montreal on June 20, 1980. Following a win over Pipino Cuevas, Duran captured the WBA junior middleweight title from Davey Moore (TKO 8) at Madison Square Garden on June 16, 1983. Also in 1983 he engaged Marvelous Marvin Hagler in a hard-fought 15 round bout for the middleweight title (L 15). “Hands of Stone” claimed the WBC middleweight belt with an exciting 12 round split decision over Iran “The Blade” Barkley on February 24, 1989. A superstar the world over, Duran is known for his ferocious, relentless ring style. Following injuries sustained in a 2001 automobile accident, he retired from the ring with a 103-16 (70 KOs) record. Duran is still very active in the sport of boxing, now serving as a promoter with DRL Promotions.